This came up in a different context last week and I hadn’t seen it before: a study in Neurobiology of Stress from last February.

What would you think if I told you that in America, alcohol-use disorder was up over a third in the last decade?

That’s a pretty shocking headline, right? Like, one third more people have alcohol use disorder — technically not alcoholism, but you can draw your own conclusions. Here’s how they define it:

primarily characterized by a loss of control over drinking, preoccupation with drinking, continued use despite negative consequences (e.g., health, job function, interpersonal relationships), tolerance, and withdrawal.

Peltier, MacKenzie R et al. “Sex differences in stress-related alcohol use.” Neurobiology of stress vol. 10 100149. 8 Feb. 2019, doi:10.1016/j.ynstr.2019.100149

So, I mean, pretty much alcoholism as we understand it in the culture.

Up one-third.

But that’s not even the headline. That’s just men. Men are +35%.

Women are up 84%.

Women are up 84%.

I mean, that’s crazy.

In real terms, also from the article:

Currently in the U.S. population, 13% or 30 million adults have an alcohol use disorder

Peltier, MacKenzie R et al. “Sex differences in stress-related alcohol use.” Neurobiology of stress vol. 10 100149. 8 Feb. 2019, doi:10.1016/j.ynstr.2019.100149

That’s over one in ten people. That’s staggering.

For myriad reasons, it’s going up fast. And in women, more than twice as fast as in men. Over 50% faster.

These are just the headlines! I’m’a read this and we’ll talk about it on the pod. But it’s bonkers.